Chantry Bridge, Normanton All Saints Church, St Catherine's Font Belle Vue, Heath Water Tower, Sharlston Pit Wheel
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AGM and Ideas for researching Non-Conformist ancestors
AGM – Ideas for researching Non-Conformist ancestors. On Saturday 7th July the society held its AGM which was attended by the society’s patron, Lord St Oswald. The proceedings were opened by Deborah Scriven as President of the society. She reminded us that although the formal part of an AGM was important so was the part played by the many volunteers who help to keep the society going. That such organisations are a means of gaining and sharing knowledge. Lord St Oswald made reference to this year’s commemorations being held nationally to mark the 100th anniversary of the end of WW1. He reminded us of the many men and women who were awarded medals for gallantry, some who survived but many who did not. Once the formalities of the AGM were over a talk was given by Jackie Depelle. She lives at Fulneck, Pudsey which is the location for a Moravian church, museum and school. Her research was inspired by the discovery that many of her ancestors were non-conformists. Jackie demonstrated how to research ancestors in this country who were not members of the Church of England. To begin with she advised that an indispensable guide is ‘Dictionary of Genealogy.’ Then various archive collections were referred to such as those at The National Library of Scotland, the Borthwick at York University and our own West Yorkshire History Centre. The National Archives at Kew have much to offer which are accessible by the website‘findmypast.’ Then there is the British Library facility at Boston Spa, the website ‘deceasedonline,’ and parish records must not be ignored. Many other ways were illustrated by Jackie but it was her sense of fun in carrying out such research that will provide new avenues to explore. Next meeting is 4th August when David Burgess will give a talk ‘ One- Name Study: The Dowles of Romney Marsh.’
Hats and Huts: Ladies of the YMCA
Hats and Huts: Ladies of the YMCA On Saturday June 2nd Sue McGeever gave an illustrated talk on a subject that had long fascinated her. She reminded us that the organisation, that is symbolised by the famous red triangle, was founded in London in 1844. Within ten years its influence had spread worldwide. However it was the outbreak of WW1 when large numbers of women joined the organisation that gained Sue’s interest that she decided to carry out research on the topic. Thousands of women from mainly middle class backgrounds volunteered to work in the ‘recreation huts’ that were set up in Britain as well as at the Front in Belgium and France. In 1914, 40,000 of these women of means provided home comforts for soldiers who found temporary reprieve from the battle field. At these ‘refreshment huts’ Tommies would be provided with hot drinks, newspapers, stationery for letters home, games equipment and even the odd concert. Sue highlighted her talk with reference to individual women who served at the Front. One in particular, Betty Stevenson from Harrogate, died from shrapnel wounds at the age of 21. She was awarded the Croix de Guerre and given a military funeral. She is also commemorated in her home town with a large wooden memorial at Christ Church. Many members found Sue’s talk exceedingly interesting especially as so little is known about the subject. Next meeting on July 7th is the AGM followed by a talk by Jackie Depelle on ‘Ideas for researching your Non-Conformist ancestors.’
Wood Street - The heart of Wakefield
The Heart of Wakefield – Wood Street. On Saturday 5th May Dr Phil Judkins demonstrated how the changes over 200 hundred years had transformed an area that had once consisted of only an inn and a yard. His research, with twenty other volunteers, revealed that Wood Street gradually became a busy and lively thoroughfare. The street was named for the Reverend Wood, who along with Thomas Lee, owned much of the land in question. With the aid of slides Phil revealed how over the 19th century plots of land were developed in which many of the public buildings we see today were built. There was the Court House of 1810, the Assembly or Public Rooms 1801, the Police station 1848, Clayton Hospital 1852, an Exhibition Hall 1865 since demolished and replaced by the Town Hall which was built in 1880 followed by the County Hall in 1898. Many people present will remember Holdsworths Iron mongers which started life in 1825 and continued until 1984. Then there was The Eagle Press, printers and stationers, which was in business for much of the 20th century. There was even a store in the 1930s that made small boats and steering gear! However the street was witness to many public events. These ranged from a hot air balloon being launched in 1827 from the site where the Town Hall is now. There was a visit from Pablo Fanque’s circus in 1847 which caused a great deal of excitement. There were prospective MPs on the hustings who were accused of bribery and corruption that led to public outrage and riots. Wood Street was witness to recruiting drives for both World Wars, a Royal visit in 1949 and the Olympic torch was paraded along the street in 2012. Phil’s talk was delivered in his usual professional way and with a great deal of humour. We next meet June 2nd when ‘Hats and Huts’ is the intriguing topic by Sue McGeever.
Wakefield in old picture postcards.
Wakefield in old picture postcards. On Saturday 7th April, Christine Leveridge brought along part of her large collection of old postcards. She is, as she explained, a deltiologist and being from Dewsbury confessed that she had little knowledge of Wakefield and district. However, Christine invited her audience to feel free to respond to the scenes displayed on screen. The postcards were mainly from the period spanning the early 1900s. There were street scenes of Wakefield and surrounding townships; celebrations attending the opening of Ossett town hall, industrial landscapes and pretty unspoilt villages. There were school children dancing around the Maypole; a group photograph of the local constabulary and local people dressed in their Sunday best. Members were quick to respond and share their memories invoked by a trip down memory lane. Judging from the reaction of many the show was an unqualified success. The next meeting is May 5th when Phil Judkins will give a talk on ‘ Wood Street – Heart of Wakefield.’
Wakefield Waterfront Project
In place of the advertised topic for Saturday 3rd March the Society was fortunate to have the services of Pam and Phil Judkins. This project has involved members of Wakefield Historical Society as well as our own members. For the first twenty minutes a dvd was shown with Pam as a guide explaining the aims of the project. She showed how the growth of Wakefield through the centuries led to it becoming an important inland port. A series of maps were on display that showed the increasing number of mills and warehouses that were built along the river along with pockets of terrace houses for the workers. Many of these buildings have now gone but those remaining have been or will be converted for other uses such as office space or leisure. An example of the latter is Rutland Mill that will become an extension of the Hepworth Gallery. Phil then continued the story elaborating on issues raised in the film. For example he showed how the importance that malting mills had on Wakefield’s economy. The barley grown came by boat, later by rail, from Lincolnshire and East Yorkshire. After it was processed much of the finished product was transported to breweries in Lancashire as well as the rest of Yorkshire. In the 1930s slum clearance saw the removal of a number of mills and old housing. The Soke mill by the weir that had stood for centuries was demolished and a new bridge was constructed over the river Calder. Phil ended his talk by praising the work done by Stella Robinson and for the display she had arranged based on the waterfront project. The next meeting April 7th is Christine Leveridge and ‘Wakefield in old picture postcards.’ All enquiries to ronaldpullan@hotmail.co.uk

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